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Customer experience is a powerful differentiator in today’s marketplace — so much that 57% of customers have said they would stop buying from a specific company simply because a competitor provided a better end-to-end customer experience. This stat helps explain just one of the many reasons why brands today have become hyper-focused on delivering the best customer experiences possible.

 

In an interview for Techonomy, Ralf Kleber, Country Manager of Germany’s Amazon.de sat down with Salesforce Senior Vice President, Ulrik Nehammer, to discuss the importance of being forward-thinking in a world driven predominantly by “divinely discontented” consumers who drive the whole business to succeed.

 

Divine Discontent is Amazon’s philosophy that refers to the constant challenge of meeting ever-evolving customer expectations that challenge brands to improve their customer experiences on a daily basis. “We love to innovate and to pioneer,” said Kleber. “We love to take things that are ordinary and then improve them to the point where people think ‘wow, that’s amazing.’ We have seen many of our innovations become the new normal for our customers. For example, looking at customer reviews as a basis for a purchase decision or same-day delivery as a new delivery standard.”

 

The power of emerging technologies has equally played a big role in both empowering a culture of innovation at Amazon while also shifting and shaping customer expectations. “All our innovations are driven by our employees. Customer obsession is part of our DNA,” said Kleber. “We constantly try to improve our services and innovate on behalf of our customers. We empower our colleagues to innovate by allowing them to experiment, take action, and learn from their mistakes. Amazon is a perfect place to fail — as failure is not considered the end of a process but a natural part of our experiments.”


Be sure to check out the complete interview here.