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Business as a Platform for Change

Salesforce’s Davos Codes Brings Learning and Fun to Local Students During World Economic Forum 2020

At the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Salesforce is once again hosting local middle school students for Davos Codes, a day of learning and fun. In its fifth year, Davos Codes teaches young people computer programming skills, the importance of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and highlights the power that technology can bring when used for social good.

Salesforce has a proud history of supporting the communities in which we live and work, and Davos, by extension of our commitment to WEF, has become one of these communities. Our commitment to the community of Davos has become a year-round program, supporting middle school students with technology, education and the chance to take part in WEF programming.

In previous years, students have learned about sustainable supply change management and environmental activism. They have also used technology to test for water pollution, and even pushed the town of Davos to reverse a decision to not recycle plastics. The students won, and the famous Swiss town has decided to adopt plastic recycling.

This year, 50+ students aged 14-16 from Davos Middle schools established a “Climate Action Lab” and learned about the SDGs, in particular SDGs 13 (climate action), 14 (life below water) & 15 (life on land).

During the full-day experience, students learned about air quality issues, both global and local, and were able to build and code a simple air quality monitor. By using a microbit-based kit, the students were able to collect, monitor and share further environmental data.

Rob Acker, CEO of Salesforce.org, at Davos Codes.

The learning doesn’t stop at Davos Codes. Through creating a network of environment sensors to monitor air quality, noise levels & observe fauna, students will find creative and innovative ways to present the results locally and add to global datasets, thus enabling students to learn the science and contribute to facilitating change.

As a direct continuum of previous Davos Codes, the experiences of the school and students evolves to sharing their experiences and learnings (and passions) with others around the world.